Posted by Andrew Abu Realtors on 2/25/2019

A bustling household can wreak havoc on the peace of mind of a natural introvert. Finding a getaway place inside your home to rest and rejuvenate so that you can return to your busy family life refreshed might seem impossible in your home. But carving out a quiet place might be easier than you think.

Make your bath a private retreat

A shared family bathroom might not seem very spa-like, but a few inexpensive additions can get you some private time in a restful atmosphere. If you have an en-suite, it’s even better.

  • You’ll need to prepare in advance, so spend a day cleaning your bathroom and clearing out the cabinets. Remove anything old or unused. Consolidate what remains into items used every day versus items used once-in-awhile. Move the less used items into cabinets or a hall closet to free up counter and tub space.
  • Use inexpensive caddies to hold everyday items. Divide these by family member if possible so that after each person starts or ends their day, all products return to the caddy for storage under the sink.
  • Set a basket beside the tub to hold hair products and body wash. Keeping these items out of the bathtub makes getting into spa-mode easier.
  • Create a basket with your favorite relaxation candles, bath bomb, bath pillow, hair wrap, and fluffy robe. When you need your private time, announce to the family that the bathroom is off limits. Grab a glass of wine, then set out your candle, fill the tub and slip away.

Reading Nook

Sometimes you need personal space to hide in plain sight. Create a reading nook for yourself in whatever alcove you can find. This nook might be an awkward corner of the living room or family room—you know, that place no one likes to sit because it doesn't have a clear view of the TV. Move a chair into that space and deliberately turn it away from the television. Add a side table and lamp. You've got your space, and you can ignore the rest of the world while you lose yourself in a book.

Unused dining room

Modern families often don't find time to use the formal dining room. This designated area often falls prey to renovations and open concept floor plans. If your home still has one, however, and even if you still use it, you can turn it into your private oasis. 

  • Extend the chandelier on a longer chain so that you can “move” the center of the room. Push the table toward one side and even consider using a bench along the back. This setup will give you more space to carve out your private space.
  • Place a chaise near a window or add a cushion to a deep windowsill to create a seating area just for you.

Since your family only uses the area occasionally, you’ll have it to yourself most of the time.

If your home truly doesn't lend itself to carving out that quiet place, talk to your real estate professional about your special needs and start scoping out a better layout.




Tags: family   privacy   space   bathroom  
Categories: family home   privacy   space   bathroom  


Posted by Andrew Abu Realtors on 2/11/2019

So, you want to create a command center to enable your family to all be on the same page once in a while. The ideas online are as numerous as they are creative. Your supply list grows along with your doubt; maybe this wasn't such a good idea. As thoughts go, a command center is a great plan when you have several people on different schedules and many activities to attend. A command center doesn't have to be large to be effective. The size all depends on what and for how many people you need to keep track.

What to track

Common things you will see command centers track are:

- Weekly Menus
- Calendar
- Budget/Bills
- Keys/Leashes/Umbrellas
- Chore Lists
- School Bags/Homework
- Quotes

To keep the command center as simple and easy to use, limit the number of things you track to five or six. This way there is a better chance your household will adapt to using this tool and not be overwhelmed. 

Where to set it up

Most of the command center examples show them set up in and around the kitchen area. The kitchen is one place you know everyone in the house will at one time frequent at least once a day, hopefully. Other locations could be a small corner of shared space or even an exposed side of the refrigerator. A mudroom or entryway could work as a more substantial drop zone and command center. Anywhere that you know it will be seen and utilized will work. The key is to make sure the accessibility is appropriate for the entire household, keeping the age of all users in mind. 

How to put it all together

Now that you have a scope of the things you want to incorporate in your command center look around your home and see if there are items you can use before you rush out and start purchasing new things. Old clipboards and corkboards are great for hanging up and controlling papers. Use whiteboards for making menus, tracking chores or writing those inspiring quotes. Even old picture frames with glass can house an updated calendar page, and with a dry erase marker you can create your family calendar. Layout all the pieces on the floor before you hang anything up, that way you can play around with it before you commit.

Visit some open houses this weekend and look for places a command center would be useful. Contact your local realtor for a list of open houses.